He said to honor ourselves

Last year I did a podcasting course with Valorie and was surprised to see her name pop up when I was reading some book reviews on Goodreads. She’s a lovely writer so I thought I’d share this post. I was also interested learn that we have similar backgrounds, having both worked in instructional design and in the photographic industry.

Books Can Save A Life

taughfalls Somewhere near Lake of the Coheeries, a place that can have cruel winters but is nevertheless enchanting. (Photo by A. Hallinan)

New Year’s weekend I retrieved from the closet the boxes of letters I’d saved from my younger days, back when people took up pen and paper to communicate. I thought it was about time to sort, organize, and purge.

I’m not sure why I saved these missives, but I’m glad I did, especially now that I write memoir. Picking up an old letter and hearing the voice of a friend from long ago can take me back in an instant and call up a stream of long-lost memories. After decades, I can still recognize a friend’s distinctive handwriting before I even begin to read the letter.

You may be familiar with the mega bestseller, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing, by

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Back in the land of the living

Here I am, back in the land of the living, or more accurately back in blogging land. I’ve been reading a few posts about how to revive a much neglected blog (like this one) and how to get back to doing what you really love doing but for some reason have stopped doing!

The most helpful advice was to stop being precious about what you write. Just write something, anything to get you back in the groove and back into the habit of writing and posting.

Taking that first tiny step is hard though. Every time I thought about writing a post I thought about whether it would be useful, interesting, or even just plain coherent. In desperation I’ve taken the somewhat radical and counter-intuitive step of disconnecting this blog with all of my other social media platforms (i.e. FaceBook, Twitter etc) in the hope that a degree of anonymity will give me the freedom to say what I really want to say. I want to quieten down the inner editor, the little voice that insists that every word is rubbish.

If you’ve subscribed to this blog in good faith, then quite possibly you are a lovely person who shares my view that being creative is hard but kind of unavoidable. I really do believe that there’s a creative person hiding inside everyone, just waiting for the chance to express themselves. My particular passion is writing, but for you it might be art, music or painting. Or cooking, or needlework, or anything really!

There’s never been a great rush of comments in response to any of my posts, but my teaching experience tells me that sometimes you can touch people’s lives in ways that are subtle and unpredictable. I’ve been privileged to teach many adults over the years and on a couple of occasions I’ve met people later in life who’ve told me that something I said when I was teaching a class had really influenced their lives or the way they thought about the world. It’s a good feeling but also a warning to be very careful what you say to people, especially if they’ve had a tough life.

So here I am. Where are you? Chime in with a comment or just let me know about your struggles. It would be good to share experiences.

Full circle

full circle

When I was young and just beginning to think about who I wanted to be in the world I settled on the idea of becoming a sound engineer. I loved listening to music and to a lesser extent playing music. Even at a young age I knew I didn’t have the commitment or talent to become a professional musician, but I loved the whole idea of working in a creative field with people who loved music as much as I did.

Unfortunately I lived in a smallish city in Australia and the options for becoming a sound engineer were limited to say the least. There was only one recording studio and jobs in the music industry were few and far between. Somewhat naively, I sent off a few letters to all of the film companies and television and radio stations in Perth asking if they had a position for me. I was 15.

Funnily enough, I received two job offers. One was as a telecine operator at Channel 9, a job which I later found out was extremely boring. I didn’t even consider that taking job because it was located in a suburb way out in the sticks and I didn’t have a drivers licence.

The other position was for an editing assistant at a small production company in the city, and this was the job I took.

I soon found that the job entailed not only film and sound editing, but typing invoices, doing the banking, getting lunches and hauling around cameras and recording gear on location. It was an interesting way to start my career.

My interest in sound came to the fore again several years later when I took a position as a sound editing assistant at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation in Sydney, Australia. This job involved replacing dialogue, recording sound effects and laying music tracks for television dramas. It was fun and in those days it was all analogue which meant that every track was a physical entity and had to be created and carried from the editing room to the sound mixing studio. The tracks were then laced up on big machines (dubbers) and mixed down into a single sound track. This is all done digitally now.

Since then I’ve had a lot of other jobs, some creative and some less so, but my recent foray into podcasting represents a return to something I’ve always had a yen for.

 

Can nonfiction be creative?

Mr Wikipedia says that creative nonfiction (also known as literary nonfiction) is a genre that uses literary forms to tell a story about true events. So if the events are real and the people are real, where does the creativity come in?

I think that it’s about using storytelling devices to weave a narrative that is compelling, rather than just a straight recitation of events, which could be really dull. Take the following example…

“I got up. It was raining. I went to the shops. I came home”. Not much of a story there!

A creative nonfiction writers would set the scene, describe the characters and build up to something actually happening. There would be a storytelling curve of some kind.

Creative nonfiction comes in many forms, from personal essays and memoirs to third person narratives about moments in time or newsworthy events. I’ve discovered that there are lots of resources out there and lots of people who are interested in the genre.

One of the websites I’d like to share is Narrative magazine. There’s some great writing on this site as well as competitions for writers of all kinds (not just creative nonfiction). Check it out, it’s really interesting.

Creative nonfiction

It’s that time of year when you are forced to sit down and have a big think about where your life is at, what you’ve achieved in the last year, and what you want to do next.

The process is a bit uncomfortable, to be honest. When I look back at the past year I can see that there were some opportunities that I didn’t make the most of. There were occasions where I didn’t speak up when I should have, and there were times when I should have been a bigger person. By that I mean more generous and less small-minded about things.

But there are always two ways of looking at things. On the plus side, I took on a new role at work (more or less successfully) and I continued to write (somewhat sporadically) on my two blogs. I love blogging, but sometimes I feel less than confident about sharing my thoughts and ideas. It’s kind of a weird hobby I suppose.

This year I’d like to bring together some of my interests and set some small but achievable goals. I’d like to get past the daydreaming stage and actually do something. There are a few options…

As I’ve mentioned in the past, my main creative interests are writing and music. I’m particularly interested in writing creative nonfiction but the truth is that I’m pretty undisciplined when it comes to getting something actually down on paper. I briefly contemplated signing up for a writing course, but then I realized that I could just as easily develop my own course of study.

The value of doing a formal course is that you need to get your assignments finished by a certain date and I find this helpful. It always motivates me to get my act together. I work quite well under pressure.

I’m considering developing a course of my own that will be ready for launching by June. That’s a random due date, but it will work for me. It gives me a semester to get the content together.

Let me know if you have any thoughts on this. I’d appreciate your feedback.

 

Learning from Vacation…about Work

Sometimes you read a post by someone who don’t even know and you just feel connected. I think it’s because you share their world view or just their general philosophy on life. It’s nice anyway, so I thought I’d share it with you.

evaluatedlife

The first two weeks of August my family went on a camping road trip from our home in Maine to my brother-in-law’s wedding near San Diego.  It was the first two week vacation I’d  taken in at least five years.  It won’t be that long before I do it again.

Here are are a few lessons I learned  (or was reminded of ) while on the road.

You see differently close up and open.

I’ve come to think of myself as a homebody because I spend so much time in and around my house.  I am NOT a homebody!  I’m an introvert who telecommutes.  I love new experiences, traveling, and being with people.   Attending to inner and outer worlds is important for balance.   Daily routines need shaking up with adventure.

There’s so much adventure to be had out there, in the real world, without an internet connection or device. …

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